Comments

  1. I love it! Differentiation at it’s best! And working with 10 kids is a dream!!

    I had a drop-in table at the back of my room, also. They could drop in whenever they needed extra support and leave as soon as they felt they could handle it. Some stayed there the whole period, but that was what it was for.

    You really should clone your process to other math resource teachers! Thanks for sharing! Pam

    • Thanks Pam! I was worried about posting this one. I’m not sure why, but it almost seems too good to be true and like I’m somehow cheating this system… does that make sense?

      The math resource class, at least the way we are trying to work it this year at our school, is pretty new. I’m in a new position where I work with students 1/2 a day and teachers the other half. Some days I feel as if I’m being pulled in 10 different directions. I think this method is going to be something that works for each one of my kiddos.

      Anyway, I digress, thank you so much for your kind words! I’ll be updating how this progresses in the future!

  2. I’m wondering if this would work for my third graders – who are pretty motivated by rewards. Our new math curriculum is making me teach in differentiated centers all the time – I just can’t manage to do whole class teaching when the whole class is at different levels – but then I find that there is disruption (I have a “dancer” this year and a “talker” and a “singer” and between them they can cause chaos in 5 minutes!) I think they might really like the gum ball šŸ™‚
    Lynn

    • Oh Lynn, I completely understand about your ‘dancer’, ‘talker’ and ‘singer’ – I have all of those too, only out of 10. HUGE personalities in my classes – probably because they’ve developed them to cope with not understanding the curriculum for the last 5+ years. This has worked so well with my class (even the 8th graders!). I spent a day explaining the system, where to find everything and how the day would run. The kiddos have to check in with me to get things “graded” and to be told what to do next. In my head, I keep a mental checklist of who I have, and have not been in touch with each day. My 5th graders got a bit squirrely on Friday (I’m sure it had nothing to do with the 2 hour snow delay, or the fact that the talent show and dance were that afternoon) so we put the activities away after about 15 minutes of realizing it wasn’t going to work and played a math game together. There was no use spending 50 minutes with both them and me being frustrated – everyone needs a break in routine occasionally! I would LOVE to hear how this works for you! Keep me updated!! I’ll be posting more about it later this week šŸ™‚

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